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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
on 355 being diverted. for the second time in one month, someone waiting for a new york city subway train has been pushed onto the tracks and killed. the latest incident happened last night in queens. as jummy olabanji reports, it has metro riders here on alert. >> new york city police say this surveillance video caught the suspect running from the subway station after the crime. >> i can't believe it is happening in this area. >> it happened last night around 8:00. police say an unknown woman pushed the man onto the tracks as the train approached the 40th street bashan in queens. investigators say the woman was sitting alone on a bench mumbling to herself before she got up and pushed the unsuspecting victim. witnesses told police they had no time to react. >> we heard about the incident in new york on twitter from one of my friends. >> earlier, a 58-year-old was shot inside -- in front of a train in times square. >> i am going to start standing back. >> people here in d.c. who take the train daily tell us while the two incidents in new york on very sad they do not plan to change their ha
? a newspaper in new york says yes and publishes the name of those who have gun permits. >>> christmas is over but shopping is not. if you're heading out to return the gift that wasn't exactly what you wanted, you will not be alone. >>> tom cruise may not be the ideal action hero but his love life made it into the top ten. "newsroom" starts now. girnlgs low. the day after christmas means relaxing or wracking up deals at the mall. for people in the west and the south it's cleanup after severe weather ripped through the region. waterspout was located in lake pontchartrain. parts of arkansas saw several inches of snow and snapping power lines and of course canceling flights. in mississippi the governor declared a state of emergency after at least eight counties reported damage. strong winds and heavy rains made the commute along this stretch of i-20 east of jackson a difficult one to say the least. it added up to a chaotic christmas day for a good chunk of the country. >> oh my god look, that's a tornado. oh, wow. >> reporter: skies over mobile, alabama, turned ominous as the storms approached. r
, new york. >> he was known for being opinionated and brave, the kind of guy you want on your side. >> there's no question, when you think about the first persian gulf war, that was the defining war for millions of americans because there had been a break, and then america went back to war. he became a household name. >> stormin' norman is hard to forget. that's a great nickname. >> we can all remember turning on the tv and seeing the bombs dropping saying okay, it's for real now. he was the person who led america right through all that. >> going to be missed. >>> in other news, with just four days to go, president obama and the top lawmakers meet today at the white house on the fiscal cliff. any compromise is expected to include an extension of the middle class tax cuts with increased rates at upper incomes. spending cuts could also be canceled. ahead of those talks, plenty of blame is being spread around already. >> john boehner seems to care more about keeping his speakership than keeping the nation on firm financial footing. >> hopefully there's time for an agreement of some ki
need help. we desperately need help in the new york, new jersey area. last night two billion people around the world tuned into a benefit concert to help raise money for sand's reliefestings and now it is time for the government to step up to the place. congress has stepped up 39 times to help state and local governments to respond to disasters. there is a wisdom here that has been in the federal government for decades. that is, when god's hand strikes no localities can handle it on their own. we unite as a nation to help one another. following katrina the government passed aid following 10 days of after the storm. we passed nine fundamentals a total of $108 billion and frankly, the damage from sandy, the economic damage is worse. they lost about 270,000 homes and in new york we lost 305,000 homes. that is new york alone. they had about 20,000 small businesses, put out of business, gone. we have over 270,000. so the damage is enormous. and you know, we members of new york delegation have always been there when other parts of the nation were struck by distafters. new york tax dollars
: guy is a business owner in hillsdale, new york. caller: i have a small music label. i discovered some news by kurt bayo. i cannot get a major label to put the music out, so i decided do it myself. host: have you looked at the fiscal cliff and how it may affect your plans for 2013? caller: of course. this is all about paying for the wars, to me. host: as a business owner, how is it going to affect you? caller: it is not going to affect me. these are taxes i should have been paying a long time ago. host: ted is in los angeles. good morning. caller: good morning. i have a comment and question. when i am trying to say is at the turn-of-the-century, major leaders saw the need to change the 12-hour workday to the eight-hour workday, which brings us to the present. my question is, does the work they need to be changed maybe to a six-hour day in order to order accommodate employment for the growing america? i used to own a graphic arts business. it was very difficult to keep employees. i ended up being the only employee. host: you are retired now? caller: yes. host: steve in phoenix, kind of
that? "the new york times" recently wrote that in florida, quote, as he ballot scandal seemed to arrive like clockwork. end of quote. i am pleased that two secretaries of state are with us today. i welcome i was secretary of state, matt schulz, state election officials are well-versed on the procedures that are needed to run their elections. conscientious state officials such as my secretary of state have sought to remove noncitizens from the voter rolls. federal officials did not assist them in ensuring that legal holes are not honored by the counting of votes from ineligible voters. in fact, the department fact the department of homeland security did all he could to prevent maintaining integrity of voting roll. we will hear that turnout rises when ballot integrity is fostered. states have a fair amount of discretion in how they choose to run elections. early voting has grown in popularity. but there's a cost even beyond the lack of a common civic engagement on election day. and i look forward to this hearing, and hope that we get an answer to these questions. but circumstances could c
and that is the newspaper and the lower hudson valley of upstate new york published the addresses of gun owners and now as you were talking eric, one lawmaker want to make that illegal. >> lawmaker state senator greg ball had this to say on cavuto. >> it is not upon illegal. this is not the first time the editorial board has done it. we have a bipartisan bill in the assembly and it is it a liberal new york state . this bill can get done. it is not about the second amendment only. it is a privacy. they should not done it victims of domestic violence and retired police. no way that the paper should have made it accessible for crim nams and we have seen what nut jobs can be capable of. >> they have done it for the handgun owners, publishing names and address said and never did it for domestic violence or sex offenders or sexual predators or any other cause than gun owners, legally and honest and law abiding citizens. >> kelly: that is an issue and perhaps there could be retaliation against the paper. >> julia: and the other said who said foil a freedom of information request and get that information there
's been waiting for snow so far this season. in new york city itself, this is not a big storm. it looks like one to three inches. the roads because it hasn't been all that cold so far this season should be under control. then you go back up into new york state. there will be pockets of heavier snow with about sick x to nine inches possible. same for northern pennsylvania. there will be spots that pick up higher snowfall totals. this is not a huge event, we're not talking about a lot of wind with this system, but it does still look like parts of southern new england will pick up most of the snow from the system. carl? >> thanks. we'll get to the national forecast in a few minutes. >>> meantime, lawmakers in washington are desperately trying to reach a deal on the fiscal cliff today, hoping to avoid steep spending cuts and tax increases. kristin welker is at the white house where the president had a high-profile meeting with congressional lawmakers on friday. good morning. >> reporter: carl, good morning to you. all eyes are on the senate this morning as majority leader harry reid and min
inches of snow from new york to maine. >> wow, wow. look at the tornado. >> definitely not a silent night for people in the southeastern united states between texas and mississippi. national weather service reported a record 34 tornadoes on christmas day. dozens of homes destroyed. and at least six deaths blamed on the storm. a state of emergency declared in mississippi. >> the chance of finding a mess yj in a bottle made a homeless man's holiday unforgetable. he found a message in the bottle and he tru threw it in a creek. the message for free tickets to the oakland zoo. a young homeless man found it and asked us not to show his face. >> has a note that says. >> you still have it?. >> yes. i carry it. i asked them instead of tickets if i was to get some food. >> dan only too happy to provide food and has given him warm clothing and a bicycle. he's just 27 and wants people to know he is does not want a handout, just a chance to go to work. >> nice tld story. >> yes. >> there is more still to come here on abc 7 news at 6:00 just ahead a late new condition report on first president bush hos
by a train as a horrified crowd looked on. also we should point out this morning -- "the "new york post"" sparked outrage and pretty emotional debate by publishing this front page photoshowing the subway victim with the train bearing down on him just seconds from death. wow. a freelance photographer on another assignment when he captured that moment. he says, he was running towards the victim wearing 20 pounds of gear and firing the flash on his camera to get the conductor's attention and not aiming to get a picture of the man there on the tracks. >> he fired his flash 49 times. >> wow. >> there has been arrest in the murder of four people outside a southern california boardinghouse. police say the suspect and three accomplices were arrested in las vegas. those four victims were apparently visiting some one at the boardinghouse when they were gunned down, early sunday. investigators will not say what led them to the suspect. >>> and authorities in arizona say they are considering criminal charges if the mother of a girl with leukemia does not get her daughter medical help. the 11-year-o
helped reduce violent crime when headed up the new york and l.a. pds but some residents aren't sure a new consultant is a good solution to the city of oakland. the oakland city council by the way votes next month on the plan to hire bratton. it's going to cost $250,000 to use him as a consultant. >>> a milestone today for san francisco's muni. the public transit system is turning 100 years old and there's a celebration designed to benefit everyone. cbs 5 reporter cate caugiran is in san francisco to give us some history. >> reporter: 100 years ago the first muni line started running from geary to 33rd avenue. today, muni railway serves about 200 million passengers a year. it has a network of 63 bus routes a historic light rail system, streetcars and three cable car lines. but before muni even existed, the city's public transit system involved horse-drawn buggies. to celebrate, service on all muni services including the cable car line will be free starting right now until 5 a.m. tomorrow. originally muni was planning to charge riders a 5-cent fare because that was the original cost about 1
's schoolchildren. this is how the story is being played this morning on the front page of the "new york daily news." this is the way it is being reported this morning in "the wall street journal." the president talked about the shootings at the elementary school calling it a hate crime and vowing to press for meaningful actions to prevent more incidents. our first call for the morning comes from new york on the line for independence. a teacher. good morning. caller: good morning. yes, i was a substitute teacher actually up an east strasbourg it. i can tell you that the respect and all of that that was a round what i was going to school is completely gone. i could not believe some of the things i got to see, and i was in middle school. these are still young the kids, 13 and 14 and 15 year olds. there is just no respect. i do not know whether it comes from the home or what. these kids are totally unmotivated in school. they have no respect for the teachers, no respect for authority. you know, it is the whole country and the whole world. we live a in a sec, evil, and perverted society and nobody want
by -- carnegie corporation of new york. celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. carthufoundati, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america, designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. >> welcome to a story that's been unfolding for nearly 40 years, but hasone largely untold, and that's the way the central characters wanted it. they were smart a
an apartment, it was not that valuable. >> it's not practical for a new york city dweller, for instance. >> when you get houses, you see the mexican properties? i'm saying they're going up there. >> oh, really? >> yeah. if anybody wants one. >> available for weekend rental. >> semiautomatic weapon included. >> somebody stole it from me, he thought i was going to stop there, and let hem get away with it, and that's not really my style. >> would you kidnap jim cramer, david? i'm not sure. >> no. >> it would end there. >> it never ends. >> if the guy had done nothing, i would have said fib. but i found him -- no one has seen "taken 2." >> how could you not? what a great franchise. >> i know. >> she's been taken. >> really bad luck. >> when we come back, apple tv, microsoft surface tablets, we'll bring you the latest development regarding both of those. more from the deal book conference in manhattan, including an exclusive with lloyd feinstein. 11:00 a.m. eastern time. hanging on to gains. at the nyse, when we return. can i help you? i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups s
. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentlelady from new york, ms. clarke, for five minutes. ms. clarke: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise to congratulate the outgoing chairman of the congressional black caucus, the remped and representative emanuel cleaver ii of missouri, who is my colleague and good friend. representative cleaver has graciously served with distinction in the house of representatives and the fifth congressional district of missouri for nearly eight years. he's been an outstanding chairman to the congressional black caucus, ushering the caucus to its 40th anniversary. he cares deep loar for all americans, children, seen -- deeply for all americans, children, seniors. who could forget his demonstrative leadership on the c.b.c. jobs tour where tens of thousands of americans lined up for an opportunity to present themselves to employers? from creating economic opportunity, supporting quality education to our children, for creating equal access to health care for all americans, chairman cleaver is truly -- has truly been the embodiment of the conscience of the congress
of cigarette. right. [ laughter ] >> stephanie: all right. sara in new york. you're on "the stephanie miller show." hi sara. [no audio] >> caller: you know the republicans that voted down the treaty for the disabilities act? >> stephanie: yes. >> caller: i don't understand how it -- it hurt my stomach when i heard this last night. i was actually watching it on tv. and my father's disabled. he had polio when he was a child. he has to wear braces and stuff but now the republicans that voted this down, how do you get that out there? i mean actually -- i know not everybody watches the senate house. >> stephanie: sara, i think it is out there. because in this day and age we're in such a 24 hour news cycle with visual images, i think the visual image of bob dole in his wheelchair and elder statesman above the republican party going to the senate floor after he was in the hospital last week and they still vote it down is -- i think that's why it is also just so -- >> i couldn't believe they did that. >> stephanie: at chr
in this country over gun control. president obama promising once again, quote, meaningful action. new york city mayor, a staunch gun control advocate, michael bloomberg who endorsed president obama for presidency, says the issue is his now. >> the president campaigned in '08 on a gun control began, and the only legislation that the president has signed since then, one is the right to carry a gun in national parks where our kids play, and one is the right to carry guns on amtrak. i assume that's to stop the rash of train robberies which stopped back in the 1800s. >> joining me now is jonathan -- i want to put a null screen here, this is from the president of the brady center, and he said this in part, i won't read everything there, but he said in part, we genuinely believe this one is different. it's different because no decent human being can look at a tragedy like this and be outraged by the fact that it can happen in our nation and because this time we're really poised to harness that outrage and create a focused exchange. we know that the outrage and the sadness unfortunately, it will dissip
from new york. mr. schumer: i ask unanimous consent the quorum call be repealed. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. schumer: thank you, mr. president. first i want to thank my great colleague from pennsylvania, i enjoyed sharing a table last night with him and his beautiful, charming, intelligent wife, who he's lucky he would be the first to admit he's lucky to have married, and their four great girls. but second, thank him for his excellent, as usual, on-target remarks. we have a great chairman of the j.e.c. and every time he comes to the floor, it shows shoas. olympia snowe, bill kristol, congressman mike simpson of idaho, david brooks, congresswoman bono-mack and walter jones, "the national review." we're here to ai seau passing the senate's middle-class tax cut is the right thing to do. you don't have to take our word for it. two-thirds of the american public agrees with us but you don't need to take their word for it, either. just listen to the voices within speaker boehner's own party. there we go. a kent conrad i am not in terms of my facility with charts. it's clear
we would address it together. >> mr. cook do you have any incumbent new york city in different approaches is that cultural between the two regulatory bodies? >> i can't speak to the cftc statute but one of the reasons it drove us to the rulemaking in the context is that we look at the data, and in our market the security based market most transactions involve a party that isn't in the u.s.. so this is a cross border market. and how you do the cross border roles is how you do title seven. and so, we felt under those circumstances that when you are looking at the whole, it was important to take a holistic approach the cross border rules and because it was such a significant, had such a significant impact on how they were going to work that we needed to do a formal rulemaking. >> to mr. cook, thank you. i know i am out of time. i'm comfortable with what mr. cook is doing because of the data that you're going to collect. mr. gensler, it makes me a little nervous and particularly because of the different approaches. you know, and there are so many other questions i want to get to. b
and pennsylvania fellows and new york fellows were all good to me. >> like your colleague, daniel akaka and former transportation chairman norman, world war ii was important in the event in their lives and in your life as well. you serve in the most highly decorated unit in the history of the united states army and received a bronze star, distinguished service cross and middle of honor. can you tell us what you learned from that experience, and how did that experience impact your public career? >> well, there are certain things that haunt me even to this day. and that is the realization of that the war can change a person's character and personality. one might be content and say i'm a good person. now, for example one week before i got into the service and put on my uniform i was and sunday school teacher and i sang in acquire. my mother was a devout methodist , christian temperance movement. they don't get any more difficult than that. the whole family was that way. then after training and going overseas, i recalled telling the first german -- killing the first german. the thing that haunts me is
to walt in new york. welcome. >> caller: hi, steph. really love your show and i'm encouraged to find your group so cheerful so early in the morning. >> it's an act. >> stephanie: yeah. go ahead, walt. >> caller: the right to work shouldn't that be the right to be a slave law? >> stephanie: yeah that's what president obama said yesterday. the right to -- >> to work for nothing. >> stephanie: yeah to work cheap. the president on the fiscal cliff yesterday. >> obama: we can solve this problem. all congress needs to do is pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on the first $250,000 of everybody's income. >> stephanie: it's everybody. >> even the rich. >> stephanie: even your favorite top 1 percenters. >> good heaven's that lunch money. >> that's the electricity bill for mitt romney's car elevator. [♪ "world news tonight" theme ♪] >> stephanie: they held more negotiations yesterday, but neither side showed a willingness to give ground. the president said we make tough spending cuts on things we don't need, and we ask the wealthiest americans to pay their part. it's a
. nothing to stop the epidemic of senseless gun violence that plague not only our major cities like new york and chicago, but countless small towns throughout our nation, towns with names like newtown, aurora, tucson, dekalb, blacksburg and littleton. in the years i have been a member of this body, this house has not held a single hearing, not one to address gun violence. while over 30,000 americans die each year from gun violence, over 400 lives have been lost by gun violence in my hometown of chicago, people are dying every day. . we in this body are afraid to talk about it. the time has come for us to stop listening to the gun lobby and start listening to the american people. the fact is the majority of americans gun owning and not, desire commonsense, reasonable gun regulation. congress must no longer stand in the way of reasonable legislation, instead we must champion it. the american people want to see background checks required on all firearm purchases instead of the fractions of sales that get done today. 408% of u.s. gun sales are by private sellers who are not required to perform b
colleagues, especially my friend from new york, caroline mccarthy, who has poured her heart and soul working every day on this issue and to our leader nancy pelosi and all of my colleagues. president obama and the american people are demanding change and we can bring that change by passing this friday a ban on the massacre assault magazines. we can pass it. believe me, if guns made anyone safer, we would be the safest nation on earth. we have more guns per capita than any country on earth. and after the unfathomable tragedy, our country is united and determined in a demand for change. without change in our gun policy, we cannot expect the outcome to be any different from what we are already experiencing and we have already had too many mass murders and the cost is unbearable. these were elementary schoolchildren. and their teachers. but there have been movie goers. americans going to town hall meetings. there are some who say any gun restriction is an imposition on their liberty. but they must understand that the level of gun violence in america today is an imposition on the liberty of all a
. then there was congresswoman mccarthy, carol mccarthy from new york, who said yesterday, quote, the gloves are off if president obama fails to act on the issue. is the white house saying anything at all about some of the backlash that it's starting to get? >> reporter: well, not so far. at this point, i think jay carney made the point he did not feel comfortable talking about policy this soon after the shooting. but this would undoubtedly be a big issue for this white house in the coming days and weeks. they will undoubtedly get a number of questions about this. and craig, i can tell you, yesterday evening, there was a vigil that formed outside of the white house. and a lot of the people who attended that vigil called for stiffer gun legislation. other people went online, hundreds of them, calling for stiffer gun legislation. so i think we will see a renewed effort on that front. the brady campaign, by the way, gave this administration an "f" for its handling of this issue, back in 2010. so there will be pressure on this president to actually take action, to follow through with his words, certainly from the pe
jersey or new york, they get to decide. not the appropriators, not the authorizing committee, the cor corps's going to decide. well, i can tell you one organization that has a problem with priorities in this country today is the corps of engineers. and to blanket whatever they say as a priority versus having government oversight and committee oversight and appropriator oversight, by giving this blanket waiver, what we do is we take away our powers to correct them. and all this does is say that it's not automatically authorized and we will have plenty of time. because all these are mitigation projects. they all ought to be authorized and approved by the committee of jurisdiction as they go forward. all they have to do is come to congress and say, give us approval on this. rather than a blanket approval. and i think we're setting a terrible precedent, because what it says is, in the future, then we're going to let the corps decides what is important rather than the -- corps decide what is important rather than the governors, rather than the state legislature or rather than the congress.
as an example. so let's just understand in this body so that there's no mistake that new york and surrounding areas will get their money because the principle of fema money and probably other disaster money as well is simply this -- at the beginning of a year, you have some money in fema, but you never know what the disasters are going to be throughout the next 12 months. but when a disaster is declared, there is money there to flow, and when that disaster money runs out, as far as i know, it's always been replaced. whether you have an earthquake in california or you have a hurricane in the gulf of mexico or you have drought in the midwest like we have or texas like we have or you have tornadoes like we have in the midwest, and sandy as the most recent example. as far as i know, there has never been any dispute under the laws at that time, and those laws don't change very often. they -- they do get the money out to the people that need it, and then when that fund goes dry, it is replenished by congress. now, unless somebody is seeking money other -- in some way other than other disasters that
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)